But should those fail, you'd float off according to whatever forces were acting on you when you broke loose.

In space, no kicking and flailing can change your fate. No. You’d definitely be weightless. You’d possibly be spinning. But should those fail, * you'd float off according to whatever forces were acting on you when you broke loose. Astronauts have tethers attached while they go for space walks. NASA requires spacewalking astronauts to use tethers (and sometimes additional anchors). NASA requires spacewalking astronauts to use tethers (and sometimes additional anchors). You'd definitely be weightless. We use tethers to ensure that can't happen. Of the 7 billion people on the planet, only 530 have been in orbit, and less than half of those have ever physically been outside a module, walking and working and floating in space. But should those fail, you’d float off according to whatever forces were acting on you when you broke loose. But if, there is some problem with the tether, the astronaut will just float away. What happens if an astronaut floats off into space? You'd definitely be weightless. These tethers have been shown in movies like gravity and passengers. NASA requires spacewalking astronauts to use tethers (and sometimes additional anchors). In 1973, the value of those tether were proven when Pete Conrad and Joe Kerwin were doing an EVA on Skylab. Duration: 01:04 2020-04-20 Certain safety measures are in place to keep one of an astronaut's worst fears from happening. In space, no kicking and flailing can change your fate.