An Ocean of Opportunities (2015) Special Reports on the Public Awareness of Ocean Acidification (2012) America and the Ocean (2011) America, the Ocean, and Climate Change (2009) Tracking Surveys (2010-2013) Special Reports on Youth and Climate Change (2010) Summaries of Data (2009 and 2010) Original Research (1998-1999) 2013; right), anthropogenic CO 2 emissions are increasing the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO 2) in Earth’s atmosphere, with about 30% (Mikaloff-Fletcher, 2006) of those emissions being taken up by the ocean. Ocean acidification could have a variety of potentially significant effects on marine species, ecosystems, and coastal communities, according to six summary reports that GAO reviewed. An overview of ocean acidification is given in chapter 3 section 3.10 titled Ocean Chemistry. Ocean acidification and hypoxia (OAH) is a change in ocean chemistry that is happening right here, right now.And, it is occurring at a faster rate than originally predicted. Since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, when humans began burning coal in large quantities, the world’s ocean water has gradually become more acidic. Ocean acidification is the name given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by their uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The Future of Ocean Acidification New research by NOAA, the University of Maryland, and international partners published in Nature Scientific Reports shows that the changing chemistry of seawater has implications for continued greenhouse gas absorption. The report explores the ways in which partner institutions are already addressing or are interested in addressing ocean acidification with their visitors as well as the extent to which the broader public and specifically the visiting public is already informed about it. Also, ocean pH dropped by up to 0.7 pH units during the P-T boundary, but ocean pH has only decreased today by 0.1 units, with another 0.2-0.3 units expected by 2100. As the pace of ocean acidification accelerates, scientists, resource managers, and policymakers continue to recognize the urgent need to strengthen science as a basis for sound decision making and action.

As nicely illustrated the recent IPCC Fifth Assessment (Rhein et al. The reports were developed by federal agencies and others and were based on extensive reviews of the scientific literature. Most scientists agree we probably won’t see wholesale extinction of shelled animals and corals from today’s ocean acidification. This phenomena has the potential to have profound impacts on living marine resources. Ocean acidification could have a variety of potentially significant effects on marine species, ecosystems, and coastal communities, according to six summary reports that GAO reviewed. As human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2) build up in the atmosphere, excess CO 2 is dissolving into the oceans where it reacts with seawater to form carbonic acid, lowering ocean pH levels (“acidification”) and threatening a number of marine ecosystems.