Finite and Infinite Games (1986) offers two contrasting viewpoints on how to live your life, whether you’re engaging in sexual relationships or warfare. They’re not competing ideas.

Carse argues that any activity can be seen as either a finite or an infinite game, the former being end-oriented and the latter leading to infinite possibilities. Finite games, like football or chess, have known players, fixed rules and a clear endpoint.

Thickly braided aphoristic observations On life, culture, society by a professor of religion. In finite games—like football or chess—the players are known, the rules are fixed and there's an agreed-upon objective that ends the game … In it, he classified voluntary human activities into two kinds of “games.” Finite games, argued Carse, have a definite beginning and end, fixed numbers of players during play, and agreed-upon rules.Scores and rankings result in a winner declared when the activity is completed. “A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play.” ― James P. Carse, Finite and Infinite Games: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility Infinite games, on the other hand, can be played by known and unknown players, have no exact … Continue reading "The Infinite Mindset Organization, with Simon Sinek" The Infinite Game is a book by Simon Sinek published in 2019.

So what makes an infinite game so different. Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory, but infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander.

Infinite games, games with no finish line, like business or politics, or life itself, have players who come and go. According to the authors, the purpose of a finite game is to win. The infinite game is a context within which finite games exist, and it’s understanding that context. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is … That seems pretty logical and obvious as that seems to be the goal of just about every game. The book distinguishes between two different types of games: finite and infinite.

Finite and Infinite Games 作者 : James P. Carse 出版社: Ballantine Books 副标题: A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility 出版年: 1987-8-12 页数: 192 定价: USD 7.99 装 … Finite games, he shows, may offer wealth and status, power and glory, but infinite games offer something far more subtle and far grander. Already an international literary event, Finite and Infinite Games is certain to be argued about and celebrated for years to come. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, an infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play.

Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism. The rules of an infinite game are changeable while infinite games have no defined endpoint. The winners and losers are easily identified. Finite games, such as football or chess, have known players, fixed rules, and an agreed-upon objective that often ends the game with a winner and a loser. According to the author, [T]he only purpose of the game is to prevent it from coming to an end, to keep everyone in play. Carse has written a book rich in insight and aphorism.

The winners and losers are easily identified. In infinite games, like business or politics or life itself, the players come and go, the rules are changeable, and there is no defined endpoint. In 1986, Finite and Infinite Games was published by religious studies professor James P. Carse. Simon Sinek identifies two different kinds of games: finite and infinite. In finite games, like football or chess, the players are known, the rules are fixed, and the endpoint is clear. Finite games are those instrumental activities - from sports to politics to wars - in which the participants obey rules, recognize boundaries and announce winners and losers.