The average surface temperature of the Earth is likely to increase by 2.5 to 10.4 °F (1.4‒5.8 °C) by the end of the twenty-first century, relative to 1990 (see Figure 1.31). This module explores the effects of those factors, including distance from the sun, aerosol particles floating in the air, and greenhouse gases. Berkeley Earth combines our land data with a modified version of the HadSST ocean temperature data set. The average temperature on the surface of Earth depends on a number of factors. Based on how much sunlight hits Earth versus how much is reflected, Earth’s average temperature should be well below freezing. Nineteen of the 20 warmest years all have occurred since 2001, with the exception of 1998. (Source: NASA/GISS).

This graph illustrates the change in global surface temperature relative to 1951-1980 average temperatures. Given the size and tremendous heat capacity of the global oceans, it takes a massive amount of heat energy to raise Earth’s average yearly surface temperature even a small amount. The average temperature on Earth is 61 degrees F (16 C). What is the Temperature on Earth?

The thermal maximum continued to around 35 million years ago when the Earth cooled into the Ice Age. It lies in a "Goldilocks zone" that is just right — not too hot, not too cold. Berkeley Earth was created to address potential biases in the land surface temperature record. These include the time of day, the time of year, and where the temperatures measurements are … The average surface temperature of the Earth is likely to increase by 2.5 to 10.4 °F (1.4‒5.8 °C) by the end of the twenty-first century, relative to 1990 (see Figure 1.31). According to an ongoing temperature analysis conducted by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), the average global temperature on Earth has increased by a little more than 1° Celsius (2° Fahrenheit) since 1880. 2016 was the third year in a row that global average surface temperature set a new record, and the fifth time the record has been broken since the start of the twenty-first century. The Azolla then sank to the bottom of the ocean, taking with it much of the carbon absorbed as carbon dioxide, therefore removing it from the atmosphere. The hottest temperature ever recorded was 159.3 F (70.7 C) and the coldest temperature was minus 128.6 F (minus 89.2 C). Earth is the only planet we know of that can support life.

The theory behind this change in temperature is that a type of fern named Azolla became extinct. Fortunately, there are other factors that affect the planet’s temperature. Monthly Global Average Temperature (annual summary) Daily Land (Experimental; 1880 – Recent) This data set is an experimental temperature time series with daily resolution. 2016 was the third year in a row that global average surface temperature set a new record, and the fifth time the record has been broken since the start of the twenty-first century. The year 2016 ranks as the warmest on record. Ice Age (35 million years ago).